Sesame and Oatmeal Bread

My Favourite Breads

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comI ate one slice and wanted some more. The rich, nutty and delicate flavour of sesame is irresistible and memorable. Sesame is used worldwide, in various cuisines to make both sweet and savoury dishes, like cookies, breads, soups, meats and confectionary. If you plan to make this bread, please make sure you include the sesame seeds. Happy Baking!

  • Ingredients
  • 450g (1Ib, 3½ American cups, 3 Australian, wholewheat flour (I used 300g whole and 150g white flour)
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • 1½ teaspoons Fleischmanns instant yeast
  • 1/3 cup toasted sesame seeds
  • 180ml (¾ cup) warm water
  • 180ml (¾ cup) warm milk
  • 1 tablespoon golden syrup or molasses
  • 30ml (2 tablespoons) milk, extra for brushing
  • Oat flakes to sprinkle

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comPlease always remember to assemble ingredients before you start. Preheat the oven to 450ºF (230º) ten minutes before baking. Sift or whisk the flour, salt and yeast together into a large bowl

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comStir in sesame seeds and make a well in the centre.

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comAdd the water, milk and golden syrup to the well

Sesame and Oatmeal myfavouritepastime.comand mix to a firm but not hard dough (you may need to add a little more water).

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comKnead 10 minutes on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic.

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comPut the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with a plastic wrap.

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comSet in a warm place for about 1 hour or until it doubles in size.

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.comKnock back the dough and knead 2-3 minutes then shape into round about 7 inches in diameter. Place on prepared sheet and leave in a warm place 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Sesame and Oatmeal myfavouritepastime.comBrush the milk over the bread, sprinkle oat flakes, and bake at 450ºF (230º) for 15 minutes, then reduce to 400ºF (200ºC) 15-20 minutes. Transfer onto a wire rack to cool.

Sesame and Oatmeal myfavouritepastime.comSlice and enjoy

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread myfavouritepastime.com

Sesame and Oatmeal Bread

Preparation time: 30 minutes; Resting time: 2 hours; Baking time: 30-35 minutes; Makes: 1 loaf

Ingredients

  • 450g (1Ib, 3½ American cups, 3 Australian, wholewheat flour (I used 300g whole and 150g white flour)
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • 1½ teaspoons Fleischmanns instant yeast
  • 1/3 cup toasted sesame seeds
  • 180ml (¾ cup) warm water
  • 180ml (¾ cup) warm milk
  • 1 tablespoon golden syrup or molasses

For topping

  • 30ml (2 tablespoons) milk
  • Oat flakes to sprinkle

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 450ºF (230ºC) ten minutes before baking. Sift or whisk flour, salt and yeast together into a large bowl. Stir in sesame seeds and make a well in the centre. Add the water, milk and golden syrup to the well and mix to a firm but not hard dough (you may need to add a little more water). Knead 10 minutes on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic.
  2. Put the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with a plastic wrap. Set in a warm place for about 1 hour or until it doubles in size.
  3. Knock back the dough and knead 2-3 minutes then shape into round about 7 inches in diameter. Place on prepared sheet, and leave in a warm place 45 minutes to 1 hour.
  4. Brush the milk over the bread, sprinkle oat flakes, and bake at 450ºF (230º) for 15 minutes, then reduce to 400ºF (200ºC) 15-20 minutes. Transfer onto a wire rack to cool.
  5. Cup measures based on American cup of 240ml (125g flour). Australian cup = 250ml (150g flour).

Points to Note

  1. Please note that oven temperatures are given as a guideline only. You may need to add or reduce the suggested temperature depending on your oven. I baked the bread for 15 minutes at 450ºF (230ºC) and a further 15 minutes at 400ºF (200ºC), total 30 minutes.
  2. For cup measures: spoon the flour into the cup, heaping it up over the top, then slide a knife across the top to level off the extra. Be careful not to shake or tap the cup to settle down the flour or you will have more than you need.

myfavouritepastime.com

32 thoughts on “Sesame and Oatmeal Bread

  1. LOOOVE sesame and seeds too. I have sprinkled them on rolls and bagels when I have baked those, but have not tried them in bread. Will have to give it a try. These photos are swoon worthy. I just need some butter. -Kat

    1. They actually taste very nice in the bread. Remember how those sprinkled on top tend to fall all over the place. At least 50% of the sprinkle just go to waste. Have a lovely evening!
      Liz

  2. I love the idea of sesame with oatmeal. I often use sesame oil in Asian dishes, as well as the seeds. I wonder if a tiny bit of that oil would be too much in bread.

    1. I think a tiny bit of that oil would be great. I also use sesame oil for Asian dishes and I really adore the aroma! Pleasant week to you!
      Liz

  3. I’m in agreement with Cecile, I never thought to use sesame seeds in breads. I do love them sprinkled on Chinese meals. When next I make my no knead bread I will add some as you have done in your recipe and see what I think! I must remember to ask my son if he has tried them in his bread he cooks in outdoor oven. I think he is really happy to have that going this time of year as he could not all last summer and autumn because of our drought and outdoor fire ban. So I’m off to lunch with sister and sister in law and then going to get some potting soil to repot the turmeric rhizomes I planted before I left on vacation. They are literally pushing up out of the soil. I went to a Farmers Market on Kauai and they were selling a big bunch (cup your hands together) that bunch, for $5.00!!!! I’m hoping to actually have them growing outdoors once the warm weather comes, but still in pots! I’d loved to have brought them home but it’s a no no with the Customs folks! We are promised sun for Wednesday and Thursday! Can hardly wait! My tan will be fading soon. Happy Tuesday Liz!

    1. Hi Sandy,
      I love sesame. I use them in virtually anything. You can also add them to brown rice after cooking, with a teaspoon or two or roasted sesame oil, and some spring onions. Tastes so good I tell you.I hope you enjoyed your lunch. We went for a movie this evening (Walt Disney-Zootopia). It was fun.
      Omg I would love to have some turmeric in my backyard too. What a brilliant idea. I must make a trip to Kauai, someday. I am absolutely sold!
      Ha ha you’re lamenting about your tan. Welcome back to Canada. Our nice weather is slowly slipping through the finger but I think it won’t be too bad. Okay I soon have to go and sleep. Have a lovely week!
      Liz

      1. Hey Liz, you should be able to buy some turmeric rhizomes at a health food store that will grow. I just planted mine with the little eye nubs sticking up out of the soil and voila! Mind you, a trip to Kauai would be good too! LOL

        1. Ha ha one of these very fine days, I shall go there too! I shall check my local health food stores. Thanks for letting me know. Have a great week!
          liz

  4. Sesame seeds are the greatest! I buy them in five-pound bags and put them in a lot of things, most notably, my cooked five-grain cereal in the morning. They don’t always come through as their own taste, but somehow add a nice ambience.

    When properly motivated (read: if I remember), I brush the sandwich rolls with egg and sprinkle on the seeds generously – a favorite in our household

    Virtual hugs,

    Judie

    1. I love sesame seeds too and use them a lot, just like you. The thing I love most is the sesame candies-i’e roast sesame, then melt some sugar until golden, add the sesame seeds and roll into balls or cut into squares and eat as a snack. Very addictive. I could eat them the whole day long without stopping!
      Virtual Bear Hug,
      Liz

  5. On another note, regarding your question to me recently concerning whether you should spoon or scoop the flour for my bread recipe and I told you it really didn’t matter… I hope I didn’t sound too vague but I’ve found I may need a bit more flour and, other times, I may need a bit less.
    Also, some bread recipes say ‘between ‘6 1/2 to 7 cups’, for example, depending upon the time of year and the humidity etc.
    That being said,it does seem that you have found that using the same exact amount of flour each time works perfectly. Interesting – and – your breads are unfailingly wonderful !! ; o )

    1. I’m good with bread, so don’t worry.The most important is knowing the consistency of dough you should end up with. I made some easy Parmesan bread today. I’ve just eaten a slice, slathered with lots of butter. Tastes really good but not good at all for my invisible waistline. I shall let you know as soon as I make the biscuits and the yankee pot roast. They are still in the pipeline. Best wishes!
      liz

      1. You are FABULOUS at bread my friend!! And you make – and post – tons of great bread recipes, which only goes to show how well you know that certain ‘feel’ the dough should have!! ; o )

  6. What a truly beautiful ‘hunk ‘o hunk ‘o bread’!!
    I’ve prepared bread with nuts, chia seeds, and what-have-you… but never with sesame seeds, which I happen to adore.
    Guess which bread I’m gonna make next… that is, after I bake some to replace the one I gave my restaurant-owner friend… and then made her share!! ; o )
    Yet another for me to print… ’cause I def. want to remember to make this. (Of course, I’m ‘pinning’ it too!!

    1. Thank you so much for pinning. I can’t remember the last time I was on Pinterest. My board is virtually empty.
      I really love the sesame aroma. I ate so much sesame when I was a kid. My mom used to roast them lightly or melt sugar, mix in sesame, and make some sesame balls.
      I’m looking forward to the next bread you’ll be making. Will let u know as soon as I make the biscuits and the Pot roast. They’re on the pipeline.
      Liz

      1. My mom was of the generation who had very few spices in her pantry… let alone sesame seeds.
        I remember visiting my godmother outside of Boston and thinking, “Hot Damn”… there’s more to meals than just meat and MASHED potatoes”!!!
        I sometimes think of my mother, and those of her generation, when digging through my spice collection. When I was a kid, no one ever prepared anything like Mexican, Indian or Thai.. and neither were there any restaurants which served much more than, “Would you like mashed, baked or rice with that?”? And the BIG THRILL came when you ate a really nice restaurant… which, possibly, as time went on, and added to the two potato and one rice choice – DAH DAH – rice pilaf….. OMG – how extraordinary – “Hell yeah… give me some of that Rice Peee-laugh’!!! ; o )

        1. Hey Cecile,
          my mother liked garlic, green onions, cilantro and eggplant.She also liked cumin, but those were the few spices we used on a regular basis.Those were the good old days. My pantry is jam-packed with all sorts of spices and herbs. I love experimenting. . I wonder what people in the future will say about today. I think we have pretty much discovered everything?? have a lovely week!
          Liz

        2. Your mother was sure more inventive than my mother with using cilantro and cumin. Or course, when I was growing up, they didn’t even sell those spices.
          I was just thinking last night, as I put away several spices, how many spices we do use compared to The Old Days!

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