What is the difference between “short vatted” and “long-vatted” wines?

Rich, Ruby Red or Rosé?

By THOR (Flickr: Sancerre Wine) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
When a wine is “short vatted’, it means the grape skins are allowed to ferment with the freshly pressed grape juice called, must, for a short period of time.

The time should only be long enough to impart the rosé colour (pink colour or the colour of rosé wines) See Photo

Côte du Rhône (Rhône valley) wines such as Châteauneuf-du-Pape or Hermitage, are long-vatted which means the grape skins are allowed to ferment longer with the freshly pressed grape juice (called must), giving a rich, ruby colour to the wine.

myfavouritepastime.com

 

Author: Liz

I love everything food: eating, cooking, baking and travelling. I also love photography and nature.

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