Mashed Rutabaga (Swede)

Frankly speaking, I’ve never eaten rutabaga, ever. It’s just one of those things…that you keep on telling yourself, you’ll try, but you just never get around to doing it. Well I got around to doing it this time and my only take on it. Don’t buy

Peel the rutabaga (swede) using a vegetable peeler

That was easy…isn’t it?

Now the difficult part. Slice it in half. Mine was so tough….

I had to use a hammer to split it into two. Be careful…don’t chop off your fingers

Cut each half into slices

Then into strips

Then into cubes of more or less equal size

Put the cubes into a pot and add enough water just to cover them.

And boil for 40-50 minutes. It will depend on how mature the rutabaga is. Mine took 60 minutes because it was so tough and fibrous on the inside.

It turns into a beautiful yellow colour but smells more or less like Brussels sprouts

Mash with butter and season with some salt and pepper to taste. Some people mash it with butter and brown sugar….I wanted mine savoury. You can plop in a tablespoon or two of sour cream. It gives it that nice zing… and give it a grinding of Parmesan cheese. Oh la la la!

Rutabaga is not a starchy vegetable. It has over 90% water, very little carbohydrate, a fair amount of sugar and dietary fibre. So the mash will not look smooth like a potato mash.

Serve hot as a side topped with some Parmesan cheese.

Mashed Rutabaga (Swede)

Ingredients

  • 1kg (2 Ib) rutabaga, peeled, sliced and cubed
  • 2-4 tablespoons butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1-2 tablespoons sour cream (optional)
  • A sprinkle of Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Put the rutabaga in a pot. Add enough water to just cover it. Bring to the boil and simmer 40-50 minutes until fork tender. The time it takes will vary. Smaller rutabagas will take less time than bigger mature rutabagas. The small ones are the best.
  2. Remove from the pot and drain. Return to the pot and heat gently for 2 minutes to dry them. Mash with a potato masher, add butter and season with salt and pepper. You can add a tablespoon or two of sour cream, if you like and a sprinkle of Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese.
  3. Point to Note: Rutabaga is not a starchy vegetable. It has over 90% water, very little carbohydrate, a fair amount of sugar and dietary fibre. So the mash will not look smooth like a potato mash.

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Author: Liz

I love everything food: eating, cooking, baking and travelling. I also love photography and nature.

8 thoughts

  1. Looks like it might have been a bit old Liz, I have never had it take so long to cook. I also don’t tend to eat it on it’s own – I mix into bubble and squeak, or add to pasties or soups, but plain mash would be a bit hard to take!

    1. Lots of people eat plain mash during Thanksgiving. The rutabagas in my local store take so long to cook. I think they sell over-matured ones. I was planning to make this Gordon Ramsay soup: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lW2wSUJXBa0 but I couldn’t find fresh, young rutabagas to make the soup so I am still planning. Have a great weekend!
      Liz

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