What is Madeira Cake?

A cake made by the creaming method, flavoured with lemon (or lime) zest and decorated with a thin slice of fresh or candied citron. It has a firm yet light texture. Some madeira recipes are similar to the Pound Cake.

The cake is named after the fortified Portuguese wine, Madeira, which was popular in England and was often served with the cake. The cake is now popular at tea time.

I usually serve my Madeira Cake with tea or for dessert with custard or with whipped cream and strawberries, on same day of baking . Do you bake Madeira Cake? share with me your recipe.

Casa Dos Vinhos-Fine Old Madeira Wine

Madeira Wine myfavouritepastime.com

Fine old Madeira is a fortified wine, aged in oak casks for five years. It has amber copper colour and is 19% alcohol by volume.

The wine is sweet, with balanced and crisp acidity, dried fruit and burnt sugar flavours with hints of ‘rancio’ and a long, warm finish.

Aroma: Rich, baked/smoke, mincemeat, toffee and butterscotch.

This wine is perfect served as an aperitif, on the rocks, with a twist of lemon.

It can also be served as a dessert wine with cheeses, cakes, fruit compotes or rich puddings.

Cooking with Madeira: it can also be used in marinades and sauces. A spoonful of fine old Madeira enhances soups, stews, fresh strawberries or pineapple.

Best of all: Madeira keeps its wonderfully distinctive aroma and taste for months after being opened.

How to use Madeira Wine

Madeira is mostly taken as an apéritif (before-a-meal) and digestif (after-a-meal). Sweet ones are better for dessert, after the meal. Because it has a very high acidity, Madeira can be paired with any food.

Last Updated: March 16, 2018

Author: Liz

I love everything food: eating, cooking, baking and travelling. I also love photography and nature.

9 thoughts

  1. 175g/6oz soft butter
    175g/6oz caster sugar
    3 free-range eggs
    250g/9oz self-raising flour
    2-3 tbsp milk
    1 lemon, zest only
    1-2 thin pieces of candied citron or lemon peel, to decorate

    Cream the butter and sugar together in a bowl until pale and fluffy. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, beating the mixture well between each one and adding a tablespoon of the flour with the last egg to prevent the mixture curdling.

    Sift the flour and gently fold in, with enough milk to give a mixture that falls slowly from the spoon. Fold in the lemon zest.

    Spoon the mixture into the prepared tin and lightly level the top. Bake on the middle shelf of the oven for 30-40 minutes, or until golden-brown on top and a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean.

    Remove from the oven and set aside to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn it out on to a wire rack and leave to cool completely.

    Then decorate with the candied peel.

    So good!

    1. This is exactly like the one I have. At what temperature do you bake it? Free range eggs would be the best of course. They give a pleasantly yellow colour to the cake. I haven’t seen a free range egg in years. Maybe I should start keeping my own free range chicken. Have a good Friday and a lovely weekend.
      Best, Liz

      1. For the Uk, its 180degree oven. I don’t know what that would be elsewhere. It’s a classic recipe that doesnt need a lot of changes. I would love my own chickens! Free range can be so expensive though. You too have a lovely day x

        1. Thank you. That would be around 350F here in Canada. My cakes bake better at 375F (190C) I changed my oven recently and all my normal baking times changed. It’s a cold windy day but very pleasant. No snow. Enjoy the weekend!
          Liz

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