Syrian Onion Bread

My Favourite Breads

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_3573

I love making bread. I guess it’s because there is a brief period of mixing then a long period of waiting, during which I can do other things, or just laze about, then the popping of the bread into the oven and most important, the eating of fresh warm bread with butter and other accompaniments. I made this Syrian Onion Bread, three weeks ago and served it with this chickpea curry. I I warmed the left over bread in the oven, the next day. It tasted just fine.

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_5762

The bread is topped with ground cumin and coriander mixed with onions and fresh mint. I especially loved the onion aroma. If you don’t like onions, you probably wont like it but you can always invent your own topping and suit your own palate. I plan to make it again, with some crumbled bacon and probably onion or Gruyere. I wish you a fantastic week. Ours has started with cold and rain, but I can’t really complain. It’s great weather for baking and eating more bread!

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4808

The first time I made the bread It was not so great.

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_3128

  • Ingredients for Flatbread
  • 450g (1Ib, 3½ American cups) all-purpose flour (use bread flour if you live outside Canada)
  • 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 1½ teaspoons Fleischmann’s instant yeast
  • 330ml (1 cup + 4-6 tablespoons; 11floz) lukewarm water

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4781Please always remember to assemble all ingredients before you start. Sprinkle two baking sheets or one large sheet  with a little corn meal. You can also use a baking stone which should be heated together with the oven.

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4783Sift the flour, yeast and salt into a bowl and make a well in the centre. Add the water to the well and mix to a soft but not sticky dough. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead, 8-10 minutes until smooth and elastic.

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4786Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with a clear film and leave in a warm place for about 1 hour or until doubled in size.

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4796Knock back the dough and divide into 8 equal pieces

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4797and roll into 5-inch rounds. Prick them all over with a fork and place 4 on each baking sheet (don’t use parchment paper). Cover with a large clear film and leave to rise for 30-50 minutes or until doubled in size. Meanwhile preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C).

  • Ingredients for Topping
  • 4 tablespoons finely chopped red onion
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons chopped, fresh mint (or I teaspoon dried mint)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper or cayenne pepper to taste
  • 30ml (2 tablespoons) olive oil

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4788Meanwhile, mix the chopped onions with ground cumin, coriander and chopped mint

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_4792in a small bowl. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper or cayenne pepper if you prefer.

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_5751Brush the breads with olive oil

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_5752and sprinkle evenly with the spicy mix.

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_3571Bake 15-20 minutes  until pale golden. (This was my second attempt at baking)

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_5763Serve warm. (my second attempt at baking)

Syrian Onion Bread myfavouritepastime.com_3130This was my first attempt at baking. The bread wasn’t so great, because I made them bigger and baked them longer.

Syrian Onion Bread

Preparation time: 20 minutes + 1 hour 30 minutes standing time; Baking time: 15-20 minutes; Makes: 8 flat breads

Ingredients:

  • 450g (1Ib, 3½ American cups) all-purpose flour (use bread flour if you live outside Canada)
  • 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 1½ teaspoons Fleischmann’s instant yeast
  • 330ml (1 cup + 4-6 tablespoons; 11floz) lukewarm water

Topping:

  • 4 tablespoons finely chopped red onion
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons chopped, fresh mint (or I teaspoon dried mint)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper or cayenne pepper to taste
  • 30ml (2 tablespoons) olive oil

Instructions

  1. Sprinkle two baking sheets or one large sheet with a little corn meal or use a baking stone preheated with the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C) convection ten minutes before using.
  2. Sift the flour, yeast and salt into a bowl, and make a well in the centre. Add the water to the well and mix to a soft but not sticky dough. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead, 8-10 minutes until smooth and elastic.
  3. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with a clear film and leave in a warm place for about 1 hour or until doubled in size.
  4. Knock back the dough and divide into 8 equal pieces and roll into 5-inch rounds. Prick them all over with a fork and place 4 on each baking sheet. Cover with a large clear film and leave to rise for 30-50 minutes or until doubled in size.
  5. Mix the chopped onions with ground cumin, coriander and chopped mint in a small bowl. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper or cayenne pepper if you prefer. Brush the breads, liberally, with olive and sprinkle evenly with the spicy mix. Bake 10 minutes at 400ºF (200ºC) then increase the temperature to 425ºF (220ºC) convection for about 5 minutes until golden. Serve warm.
  6. For cup measures: spoon the flour into the cup, heaping it up over the top, then slide a knife across the top to level off the extra. Be careful not to shake or tap the cup to settle down the flour or you will have more than you need. I use a 240ml, American cup.

Points to Note

  1. I got the best results baking the bread for a shorter time using convection setting.
  2.  Please do not roll them into more than 5 inch circles, otherwise the bread will be dry and unpleasant.
  3. December 2, 2015: Please note: I baked these flat breads in a convection oven at 400°F (200°C) for 10 minutes, then raised the temperature to 425°F (220°C) for 5 minutes to brown them quickly. They were very nice and fluffy.
  4. Last Updated: July 8, 2018

myfavouritepastime.com 

Author: Liz

I love everything food: eating, cooking, baking and travelling. I also love photography and nature.

78 thoughts

    1. Hi and Happy New Year
      I know the year is almost over but I haven’t seen you for so long. You should try it. I procrastinated about yeast for a year, then started and now I can’t stop!!! Have a lovely week!
      Liz

  1. Hi Liz, how are you?
    I hope you are having nice Autumn. 🙂
    These breads look so wonderful. I wonder if I can bake it with baking pan, ala old time flat bread. 😀

      1. I am curious about autumn and winter.
        We do not have golden leaves or snow! 😀

        I do have a baking pan, with which I make my pita bread.
        I’ll try this recipe using them! 😀

        1. The leaves in my backyard are still intact. They haven’t started falling yet. Falling leaves are beautiful to look at but it also means more work, raking and clearing the leaves. I hate to imagine winter is coming. I am kind of worn out, this year. Have a lovely week, Hari!
          Liz

        2. Liz, there is a saying I hear long ago. It can be translated as:

          “Those who live by the sea are curious about the green mountains, and those who live on the mountains may want to hear the sound of the waves.”

          I only think of autumn and winter as something poetic and romantic. The cleaning and other works did not cross my mind at all! 😀

          I wish you a fun, nice autumn and winter.
          Have a wonderful week, too! 😀

        3. Oh Hari, you’ve left me smiling. what a lovely and poetic saying. I love the sound of waves. I always wish one day I’ll have a house on the beach, somewhere! Have a lovely evening Hari. Thanks for putting a smile on my face!
          Liz

    1. I had it warm, slathered with good quality butter and bacon, the next time I made it. The sort of thing you eat without talking to person sitting next to you! have a lovely weekend!
      Liz

  2. Good for you! The bread looks wonderful and ‘sounds’ flavorful with the spice and onion! I have to find out from my friend in Australia about a bread we had at a market in Queensland, it was some sort of mid-east bread and it was to die for. We actually went back three times for a taste test! The guy who made it was there and was getting a kick out of us! We bought some and polished it off pretty quickly that night with chicken stew! Oh – I just remembered what it was called. Lavash bread….are you familiar with it?

    1. Hi Sandy
      It tasted really good. If you like the strong aroma of roasted onions, you’ll love the syrian bread.
      I am going to google Lavash right now-Here is what I found on wiki

      They say it’s Armenian and describe it as: a very thin flat bread that can be kept well in a dry place. Very interesting indeed. Is this the one you ate? Another link..
      http://www.lavash.ca/index.php? option=com_k2&view=item&layout=item&id=15&Itemid=2
      Liz

    1. […] The next day, I made this flat bread to eat with the dish: Syrian Onion Bread […]

      Thanks for making the bread. I really loved your lentil soup. I am still dreaming about it. Have a lovely week!!!
      Liz

  3. I love the smell of fresh bread baking in the oven. this bread looks so yummy ! Iam definitely going to try and make this!

    1. Dear Barbara
      How did it go with the lentil? I am making some bean and pork soup right now with some easy to make tandoori rotis. I can’t wait to sit down for dinner and savour!
      Liz

      1. It was just right with lentils. I cut them into triangles so we could scoop up some of the lentils. Now they are part of the menu.

        1. Lentils and flatbread are a great combination. Tomorrow I want to make some lentils too. They’ve always been part of our menu. I hope your weekend is good!
          Liz

  4. These look fantastic — and actually sound pretty easy to make. It’s too hot here for baking (we seem to be getting an extended summer here in Portland) but as soon as it’s soup weather, I’m putting these on my menu!

    1. It was quite hot when I made it, but the baking took a very short time so I didn’t mind at all. Hope you try it during the cool weather!
      Liz

    1. […] served the curry with some Syrian Onion Bread, which I am yet to post. The combination was great but the curry was way too much for my small […]

  5. This looks yummy, Liz! I like the onion topping, and also your idea for bacon and Gruyere cheese. I am trying to overcome my fear of yeast so I made rolls this weekend, and they actually turned out! I was so happy. It makes me want to try other recipes so I will have to add this to my list!

    1. I am on a bread making journey. I want to try all the breads of the world…I’ve made some 15, recently, and still going strong. I had the same fear of yeast but overcame it and now am totally hooked,,,funny eh! Have a great week!
      Liz

      1. I have a question for you, Liz, since you are an experienced bread maker. Does humidity affect bread making? I thought I had heard that somewhere. I was just wondering as I was going to make more rolls this week, but it is supposed to rain, so I didn’t know if I should.

        1. I am terribly sorry I didn’t see this earlier. I don’t think humidity affects bread making as long as you place in a warm corner and it rises well. I make bread especially on rainy days, when I can’t go outside or even on hot humid days, when I want to eat bread. It has never failed. Just go ahead and make and enjoy the rolls. And by the way I am not really experienced….I just love making bread and it seem to always work well for me! Have a great week!
          Liz

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